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US ARMY UTILITY SHIRT P-58 P58 28TH INFANTRY DIVISION SIZE SMALL

$55.00

The Army's first pattern utility shirt was standardized in 19581 and replaced the near identical utility jacket. It was made from olive green (OG-107) 8.5oz cotton sateen and boasted two patch pockets with straight cut flaps. The shirt also had an unusually low first button and no button cuffs.

Designed to be loose fitting, it was typically worn over a white T-shirt and was tucked into the utility trousers. Though the lighter and quicker drying Tropical Combat Uniform had been developed in 1962, three years prior to the introduction of U.S ground troops in Vietnam, the utility shirt and trousers were still worn by infantrymen early in the war.

1. Military Specification MIL-S-3001C. (17 October 1958)

 

The 28th Infantry Division ("Keystone") is a unit of the Army National Guard and is the oldest division-sized unit in the Department of Defense.[2][3] Some of the units of the division can trace their lineage to Benjamin Franklin's battalion, The Pennsylvania Associators (1747–1777). The division was officially established in 1879 and was later redesignated as the 28th Division in 1917, after the entry of America into the First World War. It is today part of the Pennsylvania Army National Guard, Maryland Army National Guard, Ohio Army National Guard, and New Jersey Army National Guard.

The division was not mobilized during the Vietnam War, although in 1965 it was selected as one of three divisions in the Army Selective Reserve Force.

Issue Date : 1960's
Color : OG-107 Olive Green
Material : Cotton
Manufacturer : Combat Fatigue Jacket
Patch Insignias : 28TH INFANTRY DIVISION
SIZE SMALL
(size on tag so please check all measurement below)
22' ARMPIT TO ARMPIT
19' SHOULDER TO SHOULDER
17' ARMPIT TO BOTTOM HEM
24' SLEEVE LENGTH
28' NECK TO BOTTOM
GOOD CONDITION
BUT PLEASE CHECK ALL PICTURES
— Please note the Private patch insignias were removed on the shoulders and small marks on the sleeves (see picture #7 with coin for scale)